Welcome to la la land: rave American style

Words by: T.T
Posted: 1/2/08 0:06

If here ever was a time and place dedicated to stamping out the vestiges of party culture it is 21st century USA. In a nation where you can't drink till you're 21, where bottled water is considered drug paraphernalia and where electronic music promoters can be indicted under the same laws as people who run crack houses there isn't a hell of a lot of leeway for having fun.

Sure, there is Pacha and Cielo in New York City, Chicago's Crobar & Vision… a handful of big name clubs pulling glamorous crowds and A-list DJs. But what about everywhere else? Despite the obstacles, there are still brave promoters and music freaks who occasionally pull off a coup like luring techno legend Green Velvet to a small-time rave in an industrial corner of Portland, Oregon (pop: 500,000; biggest musical exports: the Dandy Warhols and Beth Ditto). This coffee-fuelled hippie haven happens to be my hometown, and I wasn't about to miss a chance to see what happens when techno stars meet barebones raving.

One thing to know about partying American-style is that you'll rarely find good music in a legitimate club. You don't dress up to go out on a Saturday night so much as layer up, because chances are you'll wind up wandering through freezing cold railway stockyards (or forests, or fields) trying to find the sound system.

After a false start that takes us across the path of a slow-rolling freight train loaded with desert camouflaged military jeeps we finally find a corrugated steel warehouse with a flickering sign outside reading On Air. A pair of guys in black parkas - one fat and bearded, the other rangy and pony-tailed - wave us in and another lanky kid standing behind a folding wooden table takes our 20 bucks entry fee. Even in the ostensibly free atmosphere of a semi-legal rave there are rules in abundance. Half the barn-like space is cordoned off to form a bar (more plywood tables and a cheap metal rack full of spirits) - you have to show ID to get in here, and once "inside" you can't smoke. You also can't carry any alcohol back onto the dancefloor, meaning those of us relying on vodka to keep warm have to make repeated trips between the two. Here, having a huge parka comes in handy: I manage to sneak a dance with my drink nestled inside my oversized cuffs.

However, it isn't the funny little restrictions that are the most striking. It's the spirit. Never mind the local DJ is busy mangling Heater (ironic tune choice, given the ambient temperature is about three degrees), or that the only toilets are a row of port-a-loos on a concrete slab out back; or even that half the crowd looks too young to drive and the other half looks old enough to know better… the atmosphere is crazy. On the dancefloor drug-skinny kids are breaking out elaborate "liquid" moves that went out of fashion in Europe a decade ago. Even if they knew, they wouldn't care, because here there is still a sense that being a raver is something special, a mark of distinction. One boy in a trilby is soaking up attention, showing off moves he must have spent hours practicing. Around him, girls in tiny skirts and day-glo bangles are dancing with fierce concentration.

Half an hour earlier my friends and I looked around the warehouse and asked, "What the hell convinced Green Velvet to come out here? " Usually, he's in a DJ booth dripping with the latest high-spec equipment, commanding the world's best sound systems. Tonight, he's on a make-shift stage DJing off two decks perched on one of those wire shelves they use as discount racks in supermarkets. But he's a true professional and, more than that, a man on a mission. Soft-spoken Curtis Jones is a devout Christian who sees his DJing as an opportunity to spread love and positivity, and he's throwing himself into this set with as much energy as if it were the main room of Space.

And the reaction? Well, it beats any crowd I've seen at Space…. There are only a couple of hundred kids here, but their energy is filling up the room. It doesn't hurt that everyone seems seriously, loopily altered. Whatever they lack in legal access to alcohol they clearly make up for with fistfuls of narcotics - mushrooms, pills, speed, whatever. And it's all treated in share-and-share alike fashion. Absolutely everyone will stop and say hello, offer you something if they have something (even if it's just a smoke), or simply turn around and holler "you having fun? "

Sometimes this goes better than others. One kid, dancing next to me, turns around with a shit-eating grin and gives me the thumbs up. "Have you ever seen Green Velvet play before? " I shout over the music. He looks at me, eyes like saucers. "Are you speaking German? " he shouts back. When I burst out laughing he grins back, anxious to please. "Whatever you just said, that was cool," he assures me.

It's enough to make the most sober head feel twisted, and there aren't many here. Tall, thin and cool in black leather and Matrix-esque shades, Green Velvet finally drops the tune that he wrote for kids like this: La La Land. He originally meant it as an anti-drugs message, but that seems to go right over the heads of everyone who is shouting out the chorus in un-ironic appreciation. It is a world away from sophisticated, commodified European party culture but looking around the room, it kind of makes sense.

Outside this cold, ramshackle building the train loaded down with military hardware is still rolling inexorably past. Outside a stupid, venal government is too busy scheming to kill other people's citizens to bother feeding, educating or providing health care for its own. Outside times are tough and probably not about to get better in a hurry. But inside… well, it's la la land. A place where freedom exists, music matters and people treat each other as potential friends, not potential enemies. Right about now it feels like the best, warmest, safest place to be.


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